About Flu aboutflu

What you need to know about the flu

 

As we age, our immune system ages, too.Our risk of getting infections increases, and the severity of these infections can be greater, too.1 In fact, people aged 65 years and older who get the flu may be more likely to experience serious complications or even death.2 What’s more, if you have a condition like diabetes, heart disease, COPD, or asthma, you may be more likely to experience complications from the flu, and getting the flu may potentially make your condition worse.4 Vaccines may not protect everyone, including people aged 65+ years.3,4 You should talk to your doctor about any health conditions or risks that may apply to you.

The facts are there.In the 2014-2015 flu season, hospitalizations among people aged 65 years and older hit the highest number recorded since 2005.5 And about 90% of people who die from the flu are aged 65+, too.2

Hopitilazation

These numbers are not meant to scare you, but to move you to act and get a flu shot every year. There is a new flu shot designed to target your needs—FLUAD—and you can read more about it on this site.

In the meantime, test your knowledge below.

Add to your flu knowledge with our quiz:

 
 
 
Hopitilazation
 
Click on your answer.
1

Myth or fact?TToday's 65+ population is more active and vibrant than any other “65+ generation” before them. The percentage of people aged 65 years and older who get the flu these days is basically the same as in younger adults.

Myths

Myth. No matter how active you are or how young you feel, your immune system weakens as you get older.1 In fact, in the 2014-2015 flu season, more people aged 65 years and older were hospitalized for flu-related illnesses than in any other year since the CDC started keeping track.4

Myth. No matter how active you are or how young you feel, your immune system weakens as you get older.1 In fact, in the 2014-2015 flu season, more people aged 65 years and older were hospitalized for flu-related illnesses than in any other year since the CDC started keeping track.4

2

Myth or fact?Washing your hands frequently can protect you from getting the flu.

Myths

Myth. Despite your healthy habits, if you are aged 65 years or older, a weakened immune system can make you more vulnerable to the flu.1 Since the flu is caused by viruses passed from person to person by coughing and sneezing, it’s easy to become exposed.6 Adding good habits like washing your hands frequently and staying away from people who are sick (as well as staying away from others if you get sick) can reduce your chances of getting or spreading the flu.5 Still, your best protection is getting an annual flu shot.5

Myth. Despite your healthy habits, if you are aged 65 years or older, a weakened immune system can make you more vulnerable to the flu.1 Since the flu is caused by viruses passed from person to person by coughing and sneezing, it’s easy to become exposed.6 Adding good habits like washing your hands frequently and staying away from people who are sick (as well as staying away from others if you get sick) can reduce your chances of getting or spreading the flu.5 Still, your best protection is getting an annual flu shot.5

3

Myth or fact?Waiting to get my flu shot will help my immunity last longer into the flu season.

Myths

Myth. While waiting to get the flu shot might ensure that you have high levels of immunity during the winter months, it will leave you unprotected in the fall when flu viruses start circulating. To help protect yourself for the whole flu season, get a flu shot targeted for the 65+ population as soon as one becomes available.3,7,8

Myth. While waiting to get the flu shot might ensure that you have high levels of immunity during the winter months, it will leave you unprotected in the fall when flu viruses start circulating. To help protect yourself for the whole flu season, get a flu shot targeted for the 65+ population as soon as one becomes available.3,7,8

4

Myth or fact?Side effects from the flu shot are worse than the flu.

Myths

Myth. The most common side effects after a flu shot are swelling, soreness, or redness in the place where the shot was given, which usually lasts less than 2 days. People also may experience a mild fever or achiness shortly after the shot, which usually ends in 1 to 2 days. Typically these are much less severe than symptoms caused by the flu.7

Myth. The most common side effects after a flu shot are swelling, soreness, or redness in the place where the shot was given, which usually lasts less than 2 days. People also may experience a mild fever or achiness shortly after the shot, which usually ends in 1 to 2 days. Typically these are much less severe than symptoms caused by the flu.7