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The flu can be serious, especially for adults 65 and older.
Because the immune system can weaken with age, the flu can be more serious for adults 65 or older. In fact, this age group typically bears the greatest burden of severe flu disease.1
Adults 65 and older accounted for 78%
of all flu-related hospitalizations in the US during the 2014 to 2015 flu season, which was considered to be a severe flu season.2
Flu-related death rates
are estimated to be more than 6 times higher in adults 65 and older than all other age groups combined.2
*estimated
If you are 65 and older and have a chronic condition such as...
DIABETES
HEART DISEASE
COPD
…you may be more likely to experience complications from the flu.
Also, getting the flu may make your condition worse.3
People 65 and older may be at a higher risk for heart attack or stroke for up to 3 months after they get the flu.2
So what can you do to help prevent the flu?
The best way to help prevent the flu is to get a flu shot every year.1
So get your flu shot early in the season.
The CDC recommends getting your flu shot by the end of October each year.4
Have more questions about the flu or flu shots?
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Here are a few questions to help you start the conversation.
What’s the difference between a cold and the flu?
Should I be concerned about the flu?
What can I do to help prevent the flu?
Do I need a flu shot this year?
Is it too late to get my flu shot?
Should I get a flu shot specifically designed for people 65 and older?
Am I at risk for flu-related complications?

References: 1. Adults 65 and older need a flu shot. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/seniors/seniors-vaccination-factsheet.pdf. Updated November 22, 2016. Accessed May 16, 2017. 2. Call to action: reinvigorating influenza prevention in US adults age 65 years and older. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases website. http://www.nfid.org/flu-older-adults. Published September 2016. Accessed May 16, 2017. 3. People at high risk of developing flu-related complications. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm. Updated August 25, 2016. Accessed May 18, 2017. 4. Misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccines. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/misconceptions.htm. Updated November 17, 2016. Accessed May 16, 2017.